The Certificate in Racial Justice and Social Transformation is designed to provide students with the knowledge to be advocates for racial justice in various career paths and lead others to do the same.

 

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2021 - 2022

  • Curriculum

    Program Courses
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1700
    Course Title:Foundations of Racial Justice      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:What is the social construction of race? When did it start? What is racism? What is racial justice? This course introduces students to the core concepts of Racial Justice by examining the social construction of race and systems of oppression. Systems examined may include, but is not limited to education, healthcare, housing, etc. From a justice and advocacy perspective, we will explore how the social construction of race has led to oppression of various identity groups and how individuals and groups in society can strive to be anti-racists.
    Foundations of Racial Justice andView-GCST 1700n/a3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1320
    Course Title:Community Organizing I      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:The focus of this course will be developing leadership skills through community organizing and empowering students to make lasting changes at the college, in their own communities and the world.Students will examine past and present social movements with a special focus on organizing in communities of color. This course will also explore the contemporary meanings of community in the United States. Students will learn to identify the leader within by examining the relationship between community and citizenship. This course will also focus on issues of diversity and sustainable communities with the practical application of active leadership techniques and creative organizing on our campus.This could include aspects of the annual Earth Week Program such as Marketing, PR, Event Planning, Budgeting, Community Partnerships, Cross Campus and Cross cultural collaborations, and curriculum integration.
    Community Organizing IView-GCST 1320n/a3
     
    Program Electives - 3 credits from the following courses:
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Course Subject: ANTH         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Introduction to Anthropology: Cultural Anthropology      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines the nature of culture by studying the forms of conventional behavior (language, ideology, social organization, and technology) and their material manifestations. It also seeks to explain the variation in cultures of representative ethnic groups and societies of present and recent past in terms of ecological adaptation and cultural evolution.
    Introduction to Anthropology: Cultural Anthropology orView-ANTH 1010n/a3
    Course Subject: ARBC         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Arab Cultures      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course discusses the history and culture of the Arab world, examining various aspects of this rich and venerable civilization, the importance attached to education, the achievements of Arab science and also the internal conflicts, wide-spread poverty, and the role of women. This course is also an introduction to how the religion of Islam created a far-flung Arab Muslim world that embraces lands reaching from the shores of the Atlantic to the Indian Ocean, and examines how social institutions and culture are intertwined with politics and economics. This course is taught in English; no previous knowledge of Arabic language is required.
    Arab Cultures orView-ARBC 1030n/a3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1040
    Course Title:Introduction to Art      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces the basic concepts of the visual arts, the organization of art forms, and the historical development of architecture, painting, and sculpture with an emphasis on contemporary art. A general world view of art is presented through lecture and discussion. Students will investigate the creative aspects of the visual arts through in-class examples and a field trip to a Twin Cities museum.
    Introduction to Art orView-ART 1040n/a3
    Course Subject: ASL         Course Number:1300
    Course Title:Deaf Culture      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This class provides students with an understanding of the History and Culture of Deaf People. Students will learn about Deaf and Hard of hearing people in the Deaf Community in all areas of the United States and how the culture has progressed since the 1800's.
    Deaf Culture orView-ASL 1300n/a3
    Course Subject: BUS         Course Number:1230
    Course Title:Leadership and Teamwork      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course provides students with an understanding of the nature of leadership and teams. This course is for anyone who is a leader or wants to be a leader and wants to develop teamwork skills. Emphasis will be on a practical skill-building approach to leadership and teamwork so students develop skills that can be applied outside of the classroom. This course will include the nature and importance of leadership, characteristics of leaders, leadership styles, developing teams, managing virtual teams, ethics and social responsibility, communication, conflict resolution, and culturally diverse aspects of leadership.
    Leadership and Teamwork orView-BUS 1230n/a3
    Course Subject: BUS         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:Human Relations & Professional Skills      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course focuses on the skills necessary to be successful and effective in the workplace. In addition to effectively contributing to a team while working with a diverse population, topics include: understanding human behavior, personal qualities of success, emotional intelligence, communication, workplace etiquette, conflict resolution, self-esteem, and goal setting.
    Human Relations & Professional Skills orView-BUS 1110n/a3
    Course Subject: CHEM         Course Number:1000
    Course Title:Chemistry and Society      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:This is a basic introduction to chemistry in the everyday world, with emphasis on the role that chemistry plays in personal and professional lives. It is intended for anyone seeking to become a better informed citizen of our technological society. Basic chemical principles will be introduced and their impact on society will be discussed. The course enables students to use concepts of chemistry to think critically about current issues in science and technology. No background in Chemistry or other Natural Sciences is presumed; a strong background in math is not required. Heavy use of the internet for research and communication will be an important component of this course. This course is recommended for non-science majors looking to fulfill the science course with lab component. (3 hours lecture / 3 hours lab)
    Chemistry and Society orView-CHEM 1000n/a4
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Fundamentals of Public Speaking      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course provides instruction and practical experience in the basics of public speaking. This course has a performance component: students are expected to create and deliver informative, persuasive and other types of speeches.
    Fundamentals of Public Speaking orView-COMM 1010n/a3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:Principles of Interpersonal Communication      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This introductory course looks at communication in one-to-one relationships in friendships, families, the workplace, and elsewhere. Students will be challenged to discover and assess their own communication strengths and weaknesses as they define and discuss what it means to be a competent interpersonal communicator. Course content includes both theory and practice (skill development).
    Principles of Interpersonal Communication orView-COMM 1110n/a3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1310
    Course Title:Intercultural Communication      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:The influence of culture is an especially important and sensitive issue facing us today. A person's culture strongly influences his/her identity, beliefs, expectations, and communication style. This course explores communication across culture as defined by nationality, gender, and ethnicity while concentrating on effective use of communication in all of these areas.
    Intercultural Communication orView-COMM 1310n/a3
    Course Subject: ECON         Course Number:1070
    Course Title:Principles of Microeconomics      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers theories of consumer and producer behavior as well as market structure, the role of government in the economy, distribution of income, externalities, and taxes.
    Principles of Microeconomics orView-ECON 1070n/a3
    Course Subject: EDUC         Course Number:1280
    Course Title:Multicultural Education      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is designed to help current and future educators acquire the knowledge and skills needed to become effective practitioners in culturally, racially, and linguistically, and gender diverse classrooms and schools. Students will engage in activities and actions that develop teacher identity and criticality. They will demonstrate instructional approaches that build community and inspire and engage diverse learners. As part of the course requirement, this course requires at least 10 hours of experience (e.g., service-learning hours, volunteer hours, etc.) in the K-12 setting outside of class meeting time.
    Multicultural Education orView-EDUC 1280n/a3
    Course Subject: EEVS         Course Number:2000
    Course Title:Introduction to Environmental Science      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course focuses on the interdisciplinary nature of environmental science by including the biological, geological, and physical-chemical of the discipline. It provides a case-study based examination of the intersection of science, policy, economics, society, culture and diversity as they relate to today's environmental problems. Students will use the process of science to understand global environments and the human impacts on them by the application of primary literature, graphical skills and lab-like data analyses.
    Introduction to Environmental Science orView-EEVS 2000n/a3
    Course Subject: GEOG         Course Number:1020
    Course Title:United States Geography      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is concerned with the physical and cultural landscapes that shape the United States. It broadly examines U.S. land settlement history, agriculture, natural resources, economic activity, demographics, regionalism, urbanism, and urban/rural dichotomies. Essential to this examination is a comparative review of the contemporary American geographies of politics, community, opportunity, poverty and displacement, race and ethnicity, immigration, resource management, economic activity, and public policy.
    United States Geography orView-GEOG 1020n/a3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1270
    Course Title:Race in America      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course investigates the role played by race in the shaping of United States history. We examine the concept of race and the historical relationships in America between those of African, Asian, European, and Native descents. We will examine Reconstruction, the Civil Rights Movement and current racial issues. The goal is to broaden student understanding of United States history by a focused study of its multi-faceted racial relationships throughout the centuries.
    Race in America orView-HIST 1270n/a3
    Course Subject: HSER         Course Number:1200
    Course Title:Multicultural Awareness in Human Services      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This class examines attitudes and enhances knowledge and skills that are necessary to work effectively with culturally diverse populations in the human services field. Students will explore their own and other's cultural identities, values, attitudes, and behaviors. Adjusting services to the multicultural needs of individuals who are served will be emphasized.Recommended completion of, or concurrent enrollment in EAP 1260: College Writing Skills Development plus EAP 1230: College Reading and Study Skills or above with a grade of C or better
    Multicultural Awareness in Human Services orView-HSER 1200n/a3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1130
    Course Title:Elementary Statistics      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This is an introductory course in descriptive statistics, probability, random variables, and inferential statistics. Topics include exploratory data analysis, measures of central tendency and variation, linear regression, binomial and normal distributions, the central limit theorem, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for one population and two populations. Additional topics may include basic probability, conditional probability, Bayes Theorem, analysis of variance, and chi-squared tests.
    Elementary Statistics orView-MATH 1130n/a3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1300
    Course Title:Music in World Cultures      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course teaches music primarily from non-Eurocentric cultures which may include but is not limited to Indian, Indonesian, Chinese, Japanese, Middle Eastern, African, Native American, and African American. Through their studies of the diversity of world music, students will develop a broader understanding and appreciation of other cultures.
    Music in World Cultures orView-MUSC 1300n/a3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1120
    Course Title:Ethics in Organizations      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:Foundational theories of moral evaluation and organizational principles will first be introduced. The course will encourage assessment, analysis, and argument regarding the substantial ethical issues facing modern-day institutions. These organizations may include the fields of education, corporations and non-profits, health care, politics, marketing, the media, and others. The obligations of their members and administrators to those impacted, (students, customers, patients), as well as social responsibility to the community will be questioned. A citizens rights focus will be utilized to explore questions of justice and equality within these organizations. Additional organizational issues, such as mission, messaging, organizational culture, and the impact of cultural diversity will be considered. The challenges of personal integrity and opportunities of leadership will also be closely examined, utilizing ancient philosophical literature from Aristotle to modern day thinkers. Using classic philosophical methods to question the practices and policies of contemporary organizations, we will place a strong emphasis on ethical analysis.
    Ethics in Organizations orView-PHIL 1120n/a3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1220
    Course Title:Health Care Ethics      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course looks at the underlying assumptions that affect beliefs, practices, and policies in contemporary health care.Emphasis will be placed on understanding of the ethical principles and theories related to health care. A wide variety of health care issues and the challenges they present will be studied. Critical thinking skills will be emphasized in determining the best course of action for making ethical decisions in the health care field.
    Health Care Ethics orView-PHIL 1220n/a3
    Course Subject: POLS         Course Number:1100
    Course Title:American Government and Politics      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a general introduction to American politics with emphasis on the Constitution, citizen participation, elections, and the role of the major governmental institutions - Congress, presidency and judiciary - in the formulation of public policy in the United States.
    American Government and Politics orView-POLS 1100n/a3
    Course Subject: POLS         Course Number:1140
    Course Title:State and Local Politics      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course studies the operation and structure of state governments including executive, legislative, judicial functions as well as elections and policy formation, with an emphasis on Minnesota.
    State and Local Politics orView-POLS 1140n/a3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:1720
    Course Title:Police and Community      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course addresses the affective-oriented aspects of contemporary law enforcement. Topics include crime prevention, police community relations, ethical decision-making, cultural diversity, bias-motivated crimes, domestic abuse, problem solving, volunteerism, and interpersonal communications. Note: SOC 1110, Introduction to Sociology, recommended before taking this class.
    Police and Community orView-SOC 1720n/a3
    Course Subject: SPAN         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Spanish and Latin American Culture      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to the civilization and culture of Spain and Spanish America, with particular emphasis on comparative cultures, modern trends, the ancient Indian civilizations and African-Spanish-American influences. The course is taught in English; no previous knowledge of Spanish is required.
    Spanish and Latin American Culture orView-SPAN 1030n/a3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1320
    Course Title:World Cinema      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:World Cinema is a class in which students look at films from around the world. They explore various non-English-speaking countries' contributions to filmmaking and world culture that have been made by these countries' films. They look at two films from each country studied: one that exemplifies the historical/cultural concept that is associated with that country's films and one contemporary film from that country. The course consists of viewing, analyzing, discussing and writing about films from other cultures films as a means of understanding the impact of these works on our own as well as other cultures.
    World CinemaView-TFT 1320n/a3
     
    Program Electives - 3-4 credits from the following courses:
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1910
    Course Title:Argumentation and Public Advocacy      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is intended to develop critical and analytical skills for creating persuasive messages to audiences in formal, oppositional settings. Students will discuss and apply various communication strategies to evaluate the effectiveness of evidence, gain experience in a more formal debate setting, and evaluate and craft arguments ethically and responsibly. These assignments will prepare students for debate in a range of contexts, from interpersonal and small group settings to larger discussions of public and social policy in American culture. Prerequisite: COMM 1010
    Argumentation and Public Advocacy orView-COMM 1910n/a3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2330
    Course Title:Hmong American Literature      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:Hmong American Literature explores the works of Hmong writers as represented in the novel, nonfiction, short stories, poetry, drama/film, and Paj Ntaub (stories recorded in tapestry). To a more limited extent, characterizations of Hmong in works by non-Hmong authors may be considered, as well as relevant works by Laotian American and Asian American writers.
    Hmong American Literature orView-ENGL 2330n/a3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2350
    Course Title:Women and Literature      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course explores women as characters in and writers of literature, including fiction, non-fiction, drama and poetry. The course may also address issues of historical context, gender, class and race as a way of understanding women in literature.
    Women and Literature orView-ENGL 2350n/a3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2360
    Course Title:Global Literary Perspectives      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:Students will interpret world literature and film (either in translation or originally written in English) that present culturally diverse voices and viewpoints. Special attention will be given to colonial and postcolonial literatures that reflect the immigrant communities of Twin Cities college campuses, such as Egyptian, Finnish, Ethiopian, Hmong, Icelandic, Iranian, Korean, Liberian, Mexican, Norwegian, Russian, Somali, Swedish, and Vietnamese.
    Global Literary Perspectives orView-ENGL 2360n/a3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2370
    Course Title:African American Literature      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces the student to the writings of African-Americans from the colonial period to the present and explores the contributions of these writers to American culture, letters, and life. The course may be organized either by historic periods or topically.
    African American Literature orView-ENGL 2370n/a3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2380
    Course Title:American Indian Literature      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces the students to North American Native American Literature. Readings may include fiction, non-fiction, poetry, songs, mythology, and film from traditional and contemporary authors. Special attention may be given to Native American authors with Minnesota connections, such as Louise Erdrich, David Treuer, and Susan Power.
    American Indian Literature orView-ENGL 2380n/a3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2380
    Course Title:American Indian Literature      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces the students to North American Native American Literature. Readings may include fiction, non-fiction, poetry, songs, mythology, and film from traditional and contemporary authors. Special attention may be given to Native American authors with Minnesota connections, such as Louise Erdrich, David Treuer, and Susan Power.
    American Indian Literature orView-ENGL 2380n/a3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2390
    Course Title:Work in American Literature      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines American texts by and about workers and those concerned with workers. It focuses on how these texts portray work and the ways that work structures personal and social life, as well as on how these texts address and are formed by historical and political events that shape working conditions. The course may be organized historically or topically.
    Work in American Literature orView-ENGL 2390n/a3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1301
    Course Title:Introduction to Ethnic Studies      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This introductory course in Ethnic Studies will examine race and ethnicity in the United States. We will analyze racism and whiteness. We will question the ways that our concepts of different races have been influenced by family, the media, and education. Focus will be on the ways our ideas and beliefs about ethnicity have been shaped by issues such as slavery, colonization, occupation, migration, and immigration.
    Introduction to Ethnic Studies orView-GCST 1301n/a3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1502
    Course Title:Human Trafficking      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will explore human trafficking within the context of social justice, human rights, and feminist perspectives. We will analyze the behavior of traffickers and the ways this crime affects our global economy. We will examine criminal justice, vulnerabilities of victims and types of trafficking and how communities are responding to this activity. Students will gain an overall understanding of modern-day slavery and the issues we face regarding this crime.
    Human Trafficking orView-GCST 1502n/a3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1505
    Course Title:Women and War      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course investigates the experiences of women in war. We will discuss the ways women have been used in politics and societies. We will examine many topics including the treatment of women during the holocaust of World War II, sexuality as a weapon of war and women in combat.
    Women and War orView-GCST 1505n/a3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1040
    Course Title:American Indian Culture - Indigenous Peoples of Minnesota      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This American Indian cultural course will provide students with an overview, past and present, of the cultures of Indigenous Peoples of Minnesota, including music, dance, art, the oral story telling tradition and the American Indian connection with the environment and other non-human species. Students will also analyze how these vibrant cultures have survived oppression and genocide, and continue to thrive.Through exploring this living culture, students will gain understanding of Indigenous Peoples strong connection with, and stewardship of, the environment, learn about an important aspect of human and global diversity, and our interconnectedness with each other and our environment.
    American Indian Culture - Indigenous Peoples of Minnesota orView-GCST 1040n/a3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1490
    Course Title:Dave Larsen American Indian Immersion Experience      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:This course will focus on the American Indian Civil Rights Movement and the communitys efforts to protect, preserve and assert tribal sovereignty, language, culture, identity and treaty rights with a particular focus on the behaviors, actions and interactions between indigenous and non-indigenous individuals, groups, institutions, and nations. This course is designed to provide an up-close immersive experience of some of the events, places, peoples and systems throughout American Indian Country that have helped shape and define contemporary Indigenous theories. The course challenges participants to utilize and address issues such as sovereignty, colonization, treaty rights, political power, racism, activism, language revitalization, our relationship with this land, and traditional lifeways. This course includes in-class participation and an off campus expedition to American Indian Nations.
    Dave Larsen American Indian Immersion Experience orView-GCST 1490n/a4
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1964
    Course Title:African American Civil Rights Immersion Experience      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:This course will focus on the African American culture and the Civil Rights Movement through four themes: fragmentation, exclusion, resistance, and community. Particular attention will be given to the diversity of African diasporas within the United States. The African American Civil Rights Immersion Experience is designed to provide an up-close immersive experience of some of the events, places, people and systems throughout the United States that have helped shape and define contemporary African American theories. This course will be framed within the civil rights movement, including its social organization, customs and traditions, religion, and its arts and literature. The course challenges students to utilize and address issues such as political power, economic systems, racism, and activism. This course includes in-class participation and an off campus expedition to historical civil rights sites in the United States.**Students must receive approval through the Diversity and Equity office prior to registering for the course**
    African American Civil Rights Immersion Experience orView-GCST 1964n/a4
    Course Subject: GWS         Course Number:1502
    Course Title:Human Trafficking      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will explore human trafficking within the context of social justice, human rights, and feminist perspectives. We will analyze the behavior of traffickers and the ways this crime affects our global economy. We will examine criminal justice, vulnerabilities of victims and types of trafficking and how communities are responding to this activity. Students will gain an overall understanding of modern-day slavery and the issues we face regarding this crime.
    Human Trafficking orView-GWS 1502n/a3
    Course Subject: GWS         Course Number:1505
    Course Title:Women and War      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course investigates the experiences of women in war. We will discuss the ways women have been used in politics and societies. We will examine many topics including the treatment of women during the holocaust of World War II, sexuality as a weapon of war and women in combat.
    Women and War orView-GWS 1505n/a3
    Course Subject: HLTH         Course Number:1050
    Course Title:Stress Management      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:Stress is one of the most commonly referred to, but least understood, of all health problems. This class is designed to examine the differences between stress and personal challenges with an emphasis on the importance of the role of perception in distinguishing between the two. This course will also examine the many common sources of stress for most people and practice strategies for managing these stressors. The students will also discover how to control their stress instead of letting their stress control them.
    Stress Management orView-HLTH 1050n/a3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1210
    Course Title:Global Justice, Peace and Conflict      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course acquaints the student with the major philosophical and ethical dilemmas arising from conflicts within and between societies, with an effort to promote critical awareness and communication around peace and global justice. From a range of philosophical perspectives, students will consider global conflicts, such as those arising from war, nationalism, immigration, environmental crises, discrimination, terrorism, and global poverty. Students will seek to understand such concepts as justice, tolerance, self-determination, equality, fairness, and governance, in an effort to draw conclusions about causes of and solutions to global crises. Students will consider personal and societal strategies for conflict resolution and nonviolent change.
    Global Justice, Peace and Conflict orView-PHIL 1210n/a3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:2350
    Course Title:Multicultural Psychology      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to diversity and multiculturalism within psychology. Students will have a broad understanding of extant research on diversity from a wide variety of perspectives including international perspectives. Topics covered include: culture and identity, group behavior, stereotyping and prejudice, cross-cultural research, and international research. COMM 1310 is highly recommended before taking this course. Prerequisite: Psyc 1150 or Psyc 1160 or consent of instructor
    Multicultural Psychology orView-PSYC 2350n/a3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:1130
    Course Title:Social Problems/Deviance      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines issues and concerns in the modern world such as population, global warming, the environment, natural resources, terrorism, poverty, racism, sexism, mental illness, drug abuse, crime, sexual assault, prostitution and suicide. Social policies designed to deal with those issues are also considered. Prerequisite: Soc 1110
    Social Problems/Deviance orView-SOC 1130n/a3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:2730
    Course Title:Introduction to Corrections      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines corrections as a major component of the criminal justice system in the United States. Topics may include programs, practices and critical issues. Prerequisite: Soc 1710 or Consent of Instructor
    Introduction to Corrections orView-SOC 2730n/a3
    Course Subject: POLS         Course Number:2130
    Course Title:Constitutional Law      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will acquaint students with the content of the United States Constitution and its amendments; its interpretations within political, social, and historical contexts; and will examine the reasoning process in major judicial decisions.Prerequisite: Soc 1710 or PolS 1100
    Constitutional Law orView-POLS 2130n/a3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1200
    Course Title:Theatre in the Twin Cities      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:Students attend performances of plays in order to understand the elements of theatrical and dramatic production. Students develop criteria for the evaluation of productions as they explore the complexities of theatre and its reflection of society. They also examine their own biases and value systems and how they affect their evaluation processes regarding artistic, societal, and personal points of view.
    Theatre in the Twin Cities orView-TFT 1200n/a3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1270
    Course Title:Digital Video Production      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces basic video production concepts and techniques with an emphasis on using the elements of motion and sound as creative artistic tools. Students will critically analyze video in terms of genre, context, meaning, visual language and form and then produce and edit their own short projects that explore creative and experimental applications of the medium rather than the traditional mass communication form. Students are encouraged to use their own computer for editing if possible. Basic knowledge of the computer is helpful.
    Digital Video ProductionView-TFT 1270n/a3
     
    Required Capstone - Recommended taken last at the same time
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:2320
    Course Title:Leadership through Social Change      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:Building on the foundational local work of GCST 1320, this project and research based course will focus on further developing leadership skills and community connections at a local, national and global level to create student change agents. This course provides essential information for grassroots organizing and coalition building, and incorporates research on successful models locally and globally that have supported oppressed populations to create social and environmental change. Students will understand the importance of power theory and dynamics and then identify a local or global issue, creating strategies for collective action and developing and implementing these strategies into practice. Formerly: Community Organizing IIThrough analysis of media, culture, government policies, social movements, systemic racism and marginalization of groups, and participating in practical social change activities, students will learn to explore and synthesize multiple points of view and individual and collective responsibilities to create a more just, ethical and sustainable future. Activities could include research projects on campus, with City of Brooklyn Park, and other area, national and international organizations, data collection and analysis, research papers, presentations, creation of documentaries
    Leadership through Social Change andView-GCST 2320n/a3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1990
    Course Title:Interdisciplinary Studies Topic      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:0

    Course Description:This course will provide flexibility in offering an in-depth review of topics of immediate importance and topical interest. These topics will go beyond the introductory courses in examining specific aspects of the subject matter.
    Interdisciplinary Studies TopicView-GCST 1990n/a0
     
                                   Total Credits Required16

  • Program Outcomes

    ​Upon completion of this certificat students will be able to:

    1. Apply anti-racist approaches to personal and real-world problems to model racial justice advocacy (MnTC 7d, ELO 3d)
    2. Explain the social construction of race and systems of oppression in the United States (MnTC Goal 7b and ELO 1)
    3. Give examples of structural racism and the perpetuation of social
    inequities (MnTC 7b and ELO 3c)
    4. Identify aspects of Critical Race Theory within US political, social, cultural, and economic institutions (ELO 3c)
    5. Explain how one’s racial and social identities can dismantle systemic injustices or uphold oppressive practices (MnTC Goal 7c and ELO 3d)
    6. Explain anti-racism and the qualities of social justice agents (MnTC 7d and ELO 3c)



  • Career Opportunities

    ​​Information on careers, including salary and employment outlook data, is available on the iseek and Bureau of Labor Statistics websites: www.iseek.org and www.bls.gov.

  • Transfer Information

    ​​If you are planning on transferring to another institution, follow the guidelines available on our transfer resources web page to help you plan the process: Transfer Information

  • Degree Information

    Certificates may be earned for successful completion of courses in a specialized program of study with a minimum grade point average of 2.00 (C). A certificate shall include 9 to 30 semester credits. At least onethird of the total credits required for each certificate must be completed at North Hennepin Community College.

     

    Developmental Courses Some students may need preparatory course(s) in Math and/or English. Courses numbered below 1000 will not apply toward a degree.

    Equal Opportunity Employer and Disability Access Information North Hennepin Community College is a member of Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system and an equal opportunity employer and educator. This document is available in alternative formats to individuals with disabilities by calling 7634930555 or through the Minnesota Relay Service at 18006273529.


  • Accreditation

    North Hennepin Community College is accredited by the:
    Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
    30 N. LaSalle Street, Suite 2400
    Chicago, IL 60602-2504
    1-800-621-7440