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Active Summer 2020

The Nutrition Associates of Science is designed for students who plan to pursue a bachelor's or post-baccalaureate degree in nutrition, food science, or other allied-health fields. Our program course work provides foundational knowledge in biology, chemistry, math, writing, communication, cultural humility, and research – with an emphasis on nutrition and wellness. Nutrition is a contributing factor in bettering health and performance, as well as preventing and treating disease. Understanding how nutrition impacts health can help change lives.

Nutrition professionals work in a variety of public, private, and community settings applying nutrition-related research to everyday habits and routines.

Students admitted to the program will explore the science of nutrition, how it relates to culture, and the changing nutritional needs as we age. 

This degree has an articulation agreement to Minnesota State University Mankato.

 

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2019 - 2020

  • Curriculum

    Science General Education Courses
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Choose 2 Science Courses Based on Transfer Institution:
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:2111
    Course Title:Human Anatomy and Physiology I      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is the first course of a two-course sequence. The course offers students a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body in a classroom and laboratory setting. Topics include anatomical terminology, homeostasis, cell structure and function, histology, as well as the anatomy and physiology of the following organ systems; integumentary, skeletal, articular, muscular, nervous, special senses and endocrine. Utilization of preserved specimens in the laboratory is a required part of the course. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) Strongly recommend college level reading abilities, a working knowledge of elementary algebra and a medical terminology course. Prerequisite: Biol 1001 or 1101 with grade of C or better. Recommendations for student success in this class include: a prior course in medical terminology, college level reading and basic algebra skills
    Human Anatomy and Physiology I orView-BIOL 2111n/a4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:2112
    Course Title:Human Anatomy and Physiology II      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is the second course of a two-course sequence. This course offers students a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body in a classroom and laboratory setting. Topics include the anatomy and physiology of the following organ systems: circulatory, non-specific and specific defenses, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive and early development. Strongly recommend college level reading abilities, a working knowledge of elementary algebra and a medical terminology course. Utilization of preserved specimens in the laboratory is a required part of the course. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) Prerequisite: Biol 2111 with a grade of C or better.
    Human Anatomy and Physiology II orView-BIOL 2112n/a4
    Course Subject: CHEM         Course Number:1062
    Course Title:Principles of Chemistry II      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:A continuation of CHEM 1061, this course emphasizes chemical equilibrium, solution chemistry, acid-base chemistry, precipitation reactions, complex ion formation, oxidation-reduction, and electrochemical reactions. The laboratory portion includes experimental applications of the lecture topics: determination of cation and anion (qualitative) content of unknown mixture, kinetics, acid-base equilibria, solubility, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and an introduction to nuclear chemistry. CHEM 1061 is required for this course. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)
    Principles of Chemistry II orView-CHEM 1062n/a4
    Course Subject: CHEM         Course Number:2061
    Course Title:Organic Chemistry I      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:5

    Course Description:This course is a study of the covalent molecules associated with carbon, emphasizing the mechanism of the reactions and the stereochemistry of aliphatic, alicyclic, and olefinic molecules. Functional groups that will be studied include the saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers and halides. The laboratory portion of the course includes a thorough study of the basic techniques for the isolation and purification of molecules isolated from natural products and from reaction mixtures. (4 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) Prerequisite: Chem 1062
    Organic Chemistry IView-CHEM 2061n/a5
     
    Core Program Courses
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Course Subject: HLTH         Course Number:1070
    Course Title:Nutrition      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamental truths of nutrition principles, health promotion and disease prevention throughout life.   Topics include, in part, the study of carbohydrates, fats, protein, vitamins, and minerals and their function and role in healthy living.  It will provide introductory nutritional information for career paths in nursing and other similar fields of study.
    Nutrition andView-HLTH 1070n/a3
    Course Subject: HLTH         Course Number:2070
    Course Title:Socio-Cultural Aspects of Nutriton      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:Students in this course will explore nutrition in the context of culture looking at common dishes, special occasion foods, and cultural foods with therapeutic uses. Students will examine how cultural values, health beliefs, economic status, and learned food practices shape the development of meal patterns, eating customs, and the nutritional status of ethnic, religious, and regional groups. Students will also be given the opportunity to prepare and taste cultural foods, like amaranth, epozote, plantains, miso, and mung beans from the various regions studied.
    Socio-Cultural Aspects of Nutriton andView-HLTH 2070n/a3
    Course Subject: HLTH         Course Number:2090
    Course Title:Life Cycle Nutrition      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will examine the nutritional needs and recommendations at each major phase of the life cycle from pregnancy to older adults. Students will also explore factors that affect nutritional status in learning to assess appropriate educational materials, dietary interventions, and community nutrition programs.
    Life Cycle NutritionView-HLTH 2090n/a3
     
    Program Elective Course
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Choose 7 credits of Program Elective Courses Based on Transfer Institution:
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1940
    Course Title:Technical Writing      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course further develops writing skills as applied to technical subjects for a specialized or lay audience. Credit does not apply to the 40 MnTC (Minnesota Transfer Curriculum) credits required in the A.A. (Associate of Arts).
    Technical Writing orView-ENGL 1940n/a3
    Course Subject: HLTH         Course Number:1000
    Course Title:Introduction to Mindfullness      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:2

    Course Description:Students will develop an understanding of the current research on Mindfulness and Meditation practices. The focus of this class will be to train students to enter a calm and centered state of awareness through working with the body, breath and mind.
    Introduction to Mindfullness orView-HLTH 1000n/a2
    Course Subject: HLTH         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Health Terminology      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This is a course for all health professionals to become familiar with, and knowledgeable in, the workings of the human body. They will learn correct terms and terminology as it applies to each human body system.
    Health Terminology orView-HLTH 1010n/a3
    Course Subject: HLTH         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Personal and Community Health      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:Personal and Community Health addresses itself to the needs and issues of the individual as related to current health matters in today's society.  Our life style and modern society both contribute and detract from the holistic health concept.  This  class will assist the student in developing a plan for achieving and maintaining his/her personal health.
    Personal and Community Health orView-HLTH 1030n/a3
    Course Subject: HLTH         Course Number:1040
    Course Title:Current Health Issues and Human Behavior      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:Current Health Issues and Human Behavior is a course which will examine how biological, psychological, and social factors work together to explain health and illness. This course will focus on current health models, such as the biopsychosocial model, that help explain why some people become ill and others do not. This class has an integrative health approach in treating the whole person who may have disease and illness caused by genetic factors and/or environmental factors. Another very important aspect of this course will be to interpret and discuss the various theories of change in human behavior and how they relate to health. After participating and completing coursework, students should understand the (positive and negative) contributing roles that psychological and social factors have on biological processes in the body.
    Current Health Issues and Human Behavior orView-HLTH 1040n/a3
    Course Subject: HLTH         Course Number:1050
    Course Title:Stress Management      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:Stress is one of the most commonly referred to, but least understood, of all health problems. This class is designed to examine the differences between stress and personal challenges with an emphasis on the importance of the role of perception in distinguishing between the two. This course will also examine the many common sources of stress for most people and practice strategies for managing these stressors. The students will also discover how to control their stress instead of letting their stress control them.
    Stress Management orView-HLTH 1050n/a3
    Course Subject: HLTH         Course Number:1080
    Course Title:Consumer Health      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines current consumer health issues in society. Class content will include the examination of health care products, the food and drug industry, and our ability to create a safe living environment. This course will also include plans of action that we, as a society, can take to become better health consumers.
    Consumer Health orView-HLTH 1080n/a3
    Course Subject: HLTH         Course Number:2040
    Course Title:Foundations and Theory in Health      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:Foundations and theory in Health is a course which will examine how biological, psychological, and social factors work together to explain health and illness. This course will focus on current health behavior theories and models which are used to change human behavior and how they relate to health.
    Foundations and Theory in Health orView-HLTH 2040n/a3
    Course Subject: EXSC         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Physical Fitness      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:2

    Course Description:This course is designed to provide cardiovascular and strength enhancement through participation in an aerobic super circuit program. Selected strength training and cardiovascular equipment will be utilized as well as personalized heart rate zones and monitoring. A pre-assessment of ones current level of fitness will aid in the ability to set goals, and a post-assessment will determine improvement/s, as well as areas needing continued emphasis. Healthy lifestyle information will also be presented in order to make fitness and wellness a lifelong goal. This course can be repeated for credit.
    Physical Fitness orView-EXSC 1010n/a2
    EXSC1020(1), EXSC1041(1), EXSC1042(1), EXSC1050(1), EXSC1070(1), EXSC1110(1), EXSC1130(1), EXSC1140(1), EXSC1151(1), EXSC1152(1), EXSC1200(1), EXSC1210(1), EXSC1230(1), EXSC1240(1), EXSC1250(3), EXSC1260(1), EXSC1270(1), EXSC1310(1), EXSC1400(1), EXSC1420(1), EXSC1430(1), EXSC1440(1), EXSC1451(1), EXSC1452(1), EXSC1500(3), EXSC1510(2), EXSC1520(3), EXSC1600(1), EXSC1610(1), EXSC1630(1), EXSC1640(1), EXSC1700(3), EXSC1710(3), EXSC1720(2), EXSC1730(1), EXSC1740(1), EXSC1750(1), EXSC1751(1), EXSC1752(1), EXSC1760(1), EXSC1800(1), EXSC1810(1), EXSC1820(1), EXSC1830(1), EXSC1840(1), EXSC1850(1), EXSC1990(1), EXSC2101(4), EXSC2102(2), EXSC2110(3), EXSC2390(3), EXSC2490(4)
     
    General Education Courses
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    College Writing I (minimum grade 1.67):
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1200
    Course Title:Gateway College Writing      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:This class provides extended practice in critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. Students will develop an effective writing process and work to achieve college-level competence in reading and responding to texts, visuals, events, and ideas in a variety of written formats, with an emphasis on the academic essay. Audience awareness, interpretation and analysis, logical reasoning, and persuasive and argumentative skills will be developed. MLA style documentation of primary sources will be included.
    Gateway College Writing orView-ENGL 1200n/a4
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1201
    Course Title:College Writing I      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:This class provides extended practice in critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. Students will develop an effective writing process and work to achieve college-level competence in reading and responding to texts, visuals, events, and ideas in a variety of written formats, with an emphasis on the academic essay. Audience awareness, interpretation and analysis, logical reasoning, and persuasive and argumentative skills will be developed. MLA style documentation of primary sources will be included.
    College Writing IView-ENGL 1201n/a4
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1202
    Course Title:College Writing II      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:2

    Course Description:This class focuses on the research process, textual analysis of primary and secondary sources, rhetorical strategies for argument and persuasion, and successful integration of sources into a longer academic paper utilizing MLA (or other, as appropriate) documentation format. The class may be disciplinary, interdisciplinary, or topical in content, as noted on the class registration site.
    College Writing IIView-ENGL 1202n/a2
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:1150
    Course Title:General Psychology      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course provides an overview of topics in psychology. Topics may include history of psychology, research methods, physiological psychology, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, memory, motivation and emotion, personality, stress and coping, abnormal behavior, therapy, and social psychology. Students are strongly encouraged to check with an advisor to determine if this is the appropriate course for their degree/program. You must meet perquisites or obtain instructor permission to take this course.
    General PsychologyView-PSYC 1150n/a3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:Introduction to Sociology      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a study of social and cultural aspects of human behavior. Topics include society and culture, roles and norms, groups and organizations, deviance, inequality, social and cultural change, and research methods.
    Introduction to SociologyView-SOC 1110n/a3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1130
    Course Title:Elementary Statistics      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This is an introductory course in descriptive statistics, probability, random variables, and inferential statistics. Topics include exploratory data analysis, measures of central tendency and variation, linear regression, binomial and normal distributions, the central limit theorem, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for one population and two populations. Additional topics may include basic probability, conditional probability, Bayes Theorem, analysis of variance, and chi-squared tests.
    Elementary StatisticsView-MATH 1130n/a3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1150
    Course Title:College Algebra      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This college-level course continues the study of algebra conducted in the developmental algebra courses. Topics include polynomial, rational, inverse, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their applications. Additional topics include systems of non-linear equations, systems of linear equations, and matrices. Prerequisites: College math placement level or successful completion of Math 0970 or 0980 with grade of C or better
    College AlgebraView-MATH 1150n/a3
    Course Subject: CHEM         Course Number:1061
    Course Title:Principles of Chemistry I      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is a study of the basic concepts of Chemistry, with an emphasis on atomic theory, stoichiometric relationships, kinetic-molecular theory, molecular structure, and chemical bonding as related to the gas and liquid and solid phases. The lab portion with experiments includes observation, data collection, and mathematical applications that support the concepts being studied in class. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) Placement in this class will be determined by student college assessment score and/or successful completion of Math 1150 with a grade of C or better.
    Principles of Chemistry IView-CHEM 1061n/a4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1001
    Course Title:Biology I      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:This course focuses on the concepts of biological chemistry, cell structure and function, cellular metabolism, molecular genetics and heredity reproduction and development. The course is intended for allied health majors and others not requiring a majors-level introductory biology. High school algebra and chemistry are recommended. Prerequisite: ENGL 0990 or a score of 78 on the Accuplacer Reading Comprehension (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab).
    Biology IView-BIOL 1001n/a4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:2100
    Course Title:Microbiology      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is a study of bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa, infection, immunity, human diseases and microbiology of food and water. Laboratory exercises stress detection, isolation and control of microorganisms. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) Prerequisite: Biol 1001 or 1101 with grade of C or better
    MicrobiologyView-BIOL 2100n/a4
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Fundamentals of Public Speaking      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course provides instruction and practical experience in the basics of public speaking. This course has a performance component: students are expected to create and deliver informative, persuasive and other types of speeches.
    Fundamentals of Public SpeakingView-COMM 1010n/a3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1310
    Course Title:Intercultural Communication      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:The influence of culture is an especially important and sensitive issue facing us today. A person's culture strongly influences his/her identity, beliefs, expectations, and communication style. This course explores communication across culture as defined by nationality, gender, and ethnicity while concentrating on effective use of communication in all of these areas.
    Intercultural CommunicationView-COMM 1310n/a3
     
                                   Total Credits Required60

  • Program Outcomes

    ​Describe the relationship between nutrition, health promotion, and disease prevention. – 1, 3

    Demonstrate ability to locate, evaluate, and apply evidence-based nutrition research, guidelines, and recommendations for individuals and communities – NHCC ELO 1, 2, 3, 4

    Recognize how environmental, cultural, economic, biological, and psychosocial factors impact nutritional status, health, and disease – NHCC ELO 1, 2, 3, 4

    Utilize awareness of the cultural and life-stage perspective through active listening, digital literacy, and oral/written communications – NHCC ELO 1, 2, 3, 4


  • Career Opportunities

    Information on careers, including salary and employment outlook data, is available on the iseek and Bureau of Labor Statistics websites: www.iseek.org and www.bls.gov.

  • Transfer Information

    ​If you are planning on transferring to another institution, follow the guidelines available on our transfer resources web page to help you plan the process: Transfer Information

  • Degree Information

    The Associate of Science (A.S.) degree is intended for students whose primary goal is to complete the credentials for a specific career and/or prepare for transfer to complete a bachelorandrsquo;s degree at a college or university with whom North Hennepin Community College has an articulation agreement. The A.S. degree provides a balance of general education courses and the required scientific, professional or technical courses in the degree program.

    A student shall:

    • Earn a minimum of 60 semester credits as required in the program, with a grade point average of 2.00 (C) or above in courses taken at North Hennepin Community College. Specific programs may have additional requirements or a higher minimum grade point average.
    • Earn a minimum of 15 semester credits at North Hennepin Community College. A student must complete at least 50% of career specific courses at North Hennepin Community College.
    • Earn 30 credits in at least 6 Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC) goal areas.
    • Earn 30 professional/technical credits.
    • Have four years to complete the graduation requirements as published in the catalog in effect at the time of their initial enrollment. Students taking more than four years to complete their graduation requirements may follow any catalog published during the fouryear period preceding their graduation.

    Completion of an A.S. degree fulfills the Goal Area 2 requirement of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC).

    Developmental Courses Some students may need preparatory course(s) in Math and/or English. Courses numbered below 1000 will not apply toward a degree.

    Equal Opportunity Employer and Disability Access Information North Hennepin Community College is a member of Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system and an equal opportunity employer and educator. This document is available in alternative formats to individuals with disabilities by calling 7634930555 or through the Minnesota Relay Service at 18006273529.


  • Accreditation

    North Hennepin Community College is accredited by the:
    Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
    30 N. LaSalle Street, Suite 2400
    Chicago, IL 60602-2504
    1-800-621-7440

    North Hennepin Community College is accredited by the: Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools 30 N. LaSalle Street, Suite 2400 Chicago, IL 60602-2504 1-800-621-7440