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Pre-Engineering AS

Photo of Construction Students

The Associate of Science degree program in (Pre) Engineering is designed to prepare students for continued study in a baccalaureate degree program in engineering.

 

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2017 - 2018

  • Curriculum

    Program Courses
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Course Subject: ENGR         Course Number:1000
    Course Title:Introduction to Engineering and Design      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is designed for people interested in learning about the engineering profession. It provides an overview of the engineering disciplines. A project-based approach will be used to give experience in skills, tools, and problem-solving methods associated with completing engineering design solutions.
    Introduction to Engineering and DesignViewn/a3
     
    General Education Courses
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Course Subject: CHEM         Course Number:1061
    Course Title:Principles of Chemistry I      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is a study of the basic concepts of Chemistry, with an emphasis on atomic theory, stoichiometric relationships, kinetic-molecular theory, molecular structure, and chemical bonding as related to the gas and liquid and solid phases. The lab portion with experiments includes observation, data collection, and mathematical applications that support the concepts being studied in class. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) Placement in this class will be determined by student college assessment score and/or successful completion of Math 1150 with a grade of C or better.
    Principles of Chemistry IView03 4
    Course Subject: CHEM         Course Number:1062
    Course Title:Principles of Chemistry II      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:A continuation of CHEM 1061, this course emphasizes chemical equilibrium, solution chemistry, acid-base chemistry, precipitation reactions, complex ion formation, oxidation-reduction, and electrochemical reactions. The laboratory portion includes experimental applications of the lecture topics: determination of cation and anion (qualitative) content of unknown mixture, kinetics, acid-base equilibria, solubility, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) Prerequisite: Chem 1061
    Principles of Chemistry IIView03 4
    Course Subject: ECON         Course Number:1060
    Course Title:Principles of Economics Macro      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers mainstream theories, the economy's recent performance, national income and output levels, money and the banking system, inflation and unemployment, fiscal and monetary policies, economic growth, and international trade.
    Principles of Economics MacroView05,08 3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1221
    Course Title:Calculus I      Goal Areas:04       Credits:5

    Course Description:This course is a thorough treatment of differentiation and an introduction to integration. Topics include the definition of derivative, limits and continuity, differentiation, applications of the derivative, definite and indefinite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, techniques of integration, and applications of integration. Prerequisites: College math placement level or successful completion of Math 1170 or Math 1180 with grade of "C" or better
    Calculus IView04 5
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1222
    Course Title:Calculus II      Goal Areas:04       Credits:5

    Course Description:This course continues the study of the definite and indefinite integrals and leads to a study of improper integrals and infinite series. Topics include advanced techniques of anti-differentiation, numerical integration techniques and error bounding, applications of the integral, improper integrals, an introduction to differential equations, infinite series, parametric equations, and polar coordinates. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Math 1221 with grade of "C" or better
    Calculus IIView04 5
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:2220
    Course Title:Calculus III      Goal Areas:04       Credits:5

    Course Description:Topics in this course include solid analytic geometry, vectors in space, scalar and vector products, vector functions and derivatives/integrals, multi-variable functions, partial derivatives, alternative coordinate systems, and double and triple integrals. The geometry of space curves, line and surface integrals, cural and gradient divergence, and Stokes' theorem are also included. Emphasis will be on learning relevant mathematical methods. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Math 1222 with a grade of "C" or better
    Calculus IIIView04 5
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:2300
    Course Title:Linear Algebra      Goal Areas:04       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course includes vectors and vector spaces, matrices, matrix algebra, linear systems of equations, determinants, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Math 1222 with grade of "C" or better
    Linear AlgebraView04 3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:2400
    Course Title:Differential Equations      Goal Areas:04       Credits:3

    Course Description:The content of this course covers first and second ordinary differential equations with applications, higher order linear equations, constant coefficients, differential operators, variation of parameters, power series methods and Laplace transforms. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Math 1222 with grade of "C" or better
    Differential EquationsView04 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1020
    Course Title:Ethics      Goal Areas:06,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to both the methods and issues connected with thinking about morality and ethical systems. Moral skepticism will also be examined. The aim of this class is to allow students to be more aware of their own ethical modes of thinking and the diversity of ways morality enters into human lives.
    EthicsView06,09 3
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1601
    Course Title:General Physics I      Goal Areas:03       Credits:5

    Course Description:This is the first course of a two-semester introductory physics sequence for students with a mathematical preparation of one semester of calculus. The topics to be covered include: motion in one and two dimensions, Newton's laws of motion, energy, momentum, rotational motion, oscillations, gravitation, fluids and wave motion. (4 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) Prerequisite: Math 1221
    General Physics IView03 5
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1602
    Course Title:General Physics II      Goal Areas:03       Credits:5

    Course Description:This is the second course of a two-semester introductory physics sequence for students with a mathematical preparation of two semesters of calculus. The topics to be covered include: thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, and optics. (4 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) Prerequisite: Phys 1601; Math 1222
    General Physics IIView03 5
    College Writing I
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1200
    Course Title:Gateway College Writing or      Goal Areas:01       Credits:4

    Course Description:This class provides extended practice in critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. Students will develop an effective writing process and work to achieve college-level competence in reading and responding to texts, visuals, events, and ideas in a variety of written formats, with an emphasis on the academic essay. Audience awareness, interpretation and analysis, logical reasoning, and persuasive and argumentative skills will be developed. MLA style documentation of primary sources will be included.
    Gateway College Writing orView01 4
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1201
    Course Title:College Writing I      Goal Areas:01       Credits:4

    Course Description:This class provides extended practice in critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. Students will develop an effective writing process and work to achieve college-level competence in reading and responding to texts, visuals, events, and ideas in a variety of written formats, with an emphasis on the academic essay. Audience awareness, interpretation and analysis, logical reasoning, and persuasive and argumentative skills will be developed. MLA style documentation of primary sources will be included.
    College Writing IView01 4
    CSCI1120, CSCI1130, CSCI1190 - 1 course
    Course Subject: CSCI         Course Number:1120
    Course Title:Programming in C/C++ or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:This course continues the study of the most popular computer languages. It covers the common procedural core of C and C++ languages: data types, expressions, operators, functions, pointers, and arrays. The course also includes elements of object-oriented programming: classes and objects. Prerequisite: CSci 1130 or CSci 1150 with a grade of "C" or better
    Programming in C/C++ orViewn/a4
    Course Subject: CSCI         Course Number:1130
    Course Title:Introduction to Programming in Java or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:This course provides an introduction to object-oriented programming using the Java programming language. Topics include data types, operators, operands, expressions, conditional statements, repetition, arrays, methods, parameter passing, and returning values. The course will cover applets, graphics and events handling. Students will be also introduced to classes, objects, and inheritance. Prerequisite: Math 1150 or higher with a grade of "C" or better.
    Introduction to Programming in Java orViewn/a4
    Course Subject: CSCI         Course Number:1190
    Course Title:Introduction to C++ Programming      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:
    Introduction to C++ Programmingn/a4
    BIOL1000, BIOL1001, BIOL1200 - 1 course
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1000
    Course Title:Life Science or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:The course introduces the breadth of biology from the principles of chemistry to ecology. The production and utilization of biological energy is explored at the cellular and organism level. The principles of inheritance and cellular reproduction are explored at the molecular, cellular level and organism levels. The unity and diversity of life and life processes is emphasized. The laboratory focuses on the techniques required to discover biological principles. Activities are hands-on. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab).
    Life Science orView03 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1001
    Course Title:Biology I or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course focuses on the concepts of biological chemistry, cell structure and function, cellular metabolism, molecular genetics and heredity reproduction and development. The course is intended for allied health majors and others not requiring a majors-level introductory biology. High school algebra and chemistry are recommended. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab).
    Biology I orView03 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1200
    Course Title:Current Environmental Issues      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:4

    Course Description:Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course examines various aspects of natural and human-made ecosystems, human's intervention, and the subsequent impact on society and nature. It emphasizes current problems, values, and projection for the future. The lab involves internet exercises, videos, group discussion, individual and group projects, field trips and other outdoor activities. (3 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)
    Current Environmental IssuesView03,10 4
     
    NHCC Residency and GPA
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    15 Credits must be earned at NHCC
     
                                   Total Credit Required60
    Notes:

    Engr 1200 - Engineering Graphics is an additional recommended course.


  • Program Outcomes

    nowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World:

    • Understand the major principles of calculus-based mathematics and their relationship to engineering problems and solutions.
    • Understand the major principles of general physics and chemistry and their relationship to engineering problems and solutions.

    Intellectual and Practical Skills:

    • Appropriately communicate technical material orally and in writing.

    Personal and Social Responsibility:

    • Appropriately and safely use laboratory equipment in physics and chemistry coursework Integrative Learning

    Integrative Learning:

    • Apply the major principles of calculus-based mathematics to engineering problems and solutions.
    • Apply the major principles of general physics and chemistry to their engineering courses.

  • Career Opportunities

    Information on careers, including salary and employment outlook data, is available on the iseek and Bureau of Labor Statistics websites: www.iseek.org and www.bls.gov.

  • Transfer Information

    If you are planning on transferring to another institution, follow the guidelines available on our transfer resources web page to help you plan the process: Transfer Information

  • Degree Information

    The Associate of Science (A.S.) degree is intended for students whose primary goal is to complete the credentials for a specific career and/or prepare for transfer to complete a bachelor’s degree at a college or university with whom North Hennepin Community College has an articulation agreement. The A.S. degree provides a balance of general education courses and the required scientific, professional or technical courses in the degree program.

    A student shall:

    • Earn a minimum of 60 semester credits as required in the program, with a grade point average of 2.00 (C) or above in courses taken at North Hennepin Community College. Specific programs may have additional requirements or a higher minimum grade point average.
    • Earn a minimum of 15 semester credits at North Hennepin Community College. A student must complete at least 50% of career specific courses at North Hennepin Community College.
    • Earn 30 credits in at least 6 Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC) goal areas.
    • Earn 30 professional/technical credits.
    • Have four years to complete the graduation requirements as published in the catalog in effect at the time of their initial enrollment. Students taking more than four years to complete their graduation requirements may follow any catalog published during the four-year period preceding their graduation.

    Completion of an A.S. degree fulfills the Goal Area 2 requirement of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC).


    Developmental Courses

    Some students may need preparatory course(s) in Math and/or English. Courses numbered below 1000 will not apply toward a degree.


    Equal Opportunity Employer and Disability Access Information

    North Hennepin Community College is a member of Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system and an equal opportunity employer and educator. This document is available in alternative formats to individuals with disabilities by calling 763-493-0555 or through the Minnesota Relay Service at 1-800-627-3529.

  • Accreditation

    North Hennepin Community College is accredited by the:
    Higher Learning Commission
    30 N. LaSalle Street, Suite 2400
    Chicago, IL 60602-2504
    1-800-621-7440

 

Contact Information

Admissions and Outreach Office
Educational Services Building
763-424-0724
admission@nhcc.edu